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Full text of "Biennial report of the Industrial Farm Colony for Women, Kinston, N.C"

T>11 . 
: 1940/41 
04.' 



BIENNIAL REPORT 

OF THE 

State Industrial Farm Colony 
for Women 

KINSTON, N. C. 




For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1942 



Biennial Report for 1940-41 — 1941-42 



PERSONNEL 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
(Terms expire June 4, 1943) 

Rev. J. R. Rountree, Chairman ■_ Kinston 

Mrs. G. V. Cowper, Secretary-Treasurer Kinston 

Miss Gertrude Weil Goldsboro 

Mrs. Francis D. Winston Windsor 

Ed. W. Sum mersill Jacksonville 

VISITING STAFF 

Thos. Leslie Lee, M.D., F.A.G.S. Medical Director 

Geo. W. Price, D.D.S Dentist 

RESIDENT EXECUTIVE STAFF 

Elsa Ernst Superintendent 

Christine Maynard Budget Officer 



State Industrial Farm Colony for Women 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 

To His Excellency, J. Melville Broughton, Governor, 
and the General Assembly of North Carolina. 

Gentlemen : 

We have the honor of submitting, herewith, the report of 
the State Industrial Farm Colony for Women, for the biennial 
period dating from July 1, 1940, through June 30, 1942. 

As is pointed out in the report of the superintendent, the 
number of women needing the training given by the State Farm 
Colony for Women has appallingly increased, now that our coun- 
try is at war. Therefore, the need for greater facilities is even 
more urgent now than when we stressed this need in our report 
of two years ago. Nevertheless, we fully understand that the 
much needed buildings, facilities and personnel cannot be 
requested of the State Legislature at the present time, since 
permanent improvements are prohibited to the state under 
existing federal regulations, because of the war emergency. 

We do, however, wish to draw your attention to the excep- 
tionally fine work that has been done by the Colony with women 
during this past biennium, especially with those who have come 
to us from the camp areas. The practical human value of this 
work to the state, and especially to the defense areas is evident 
to all who are interested in human welfare and the worth of the 
individual. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Rev. J. R. Rountree, Chairman, 
Mrs. G. V. Cowper, Secretary <-Treas., 
of the Board of Directors. 



4 Biennial Report for 1940-41 — 1941-42 

REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT 

To the Honorable Board of Directors of the 
State Industrial Farm Colony for Women. 

During the past year an increasingly large number of women 
has been sent to us from the areas around the camps of the armed 
forces. During July-August, 1941, 30 per cent of women admitted 
to the Colony came from the camp areas; from September 
through December, 1941, 40 per cent of admissions came from 
camp areas. For the entire past year (September 1941 to Sep- 
tember 1942) 60 per cent of admissions came from camp areas, 
while for the present quarter to date, July to September 1942, the 
admission of women from camp areas has risen to 70 per cent of 
all admissions. 

So far no woman who has come to us from the camp areas has 
failed. This is a remarkable record, and is even better than we 
have been able to achieve with other groups, our previous per- 
centage of women who succeeded after leaving the Colony being 
around 80 per cent. This percentage was high, but has shrunk 
into insignificance beside the splendid success we have had with 
women from the camp areas. In all cases, we have also worked 
through each woman to other needy members of her family group 
and have in this way assisted in the better community adjust- 
ment of other members of her family also. Many of our parolees 
are now not merely content to be self-supporting, but in many 
ways are making worthwhile contributions to their communities. 

As has been pointed out in previous reports, no waiting list 
can be kept at the Colony because some immediate disposition 
must be made of every case sentenced by the court. Therefore, 
hundreds of women who should be in the Colony and cannot be 
admitted for lack of room, either serve jail sentences, or are 
immediately turned loose to prey further on their own communi- 
ties, or else warned out of the county to become a menace else- 
where. A conservative estimate of such cases who could profit 
by Colony training was, before the war, between 700 and 800 
women annually. This figure has been carefully estimated from 
a detailed study of jail figures in North Carolina over a period 
of years. Now in war time this number has been appallingly 
increased, hence the very urgent need for greater facilities at 
the Colony. However, we cannot request the much-needed addi- 
tional buildings, personnel, and facilities since permanent im- 



State Industrial Farm Colony for Women 5 

provements are prohibited to the state under existing federal 
regulations because of the war emergency. 

The health of all our women must be approved by the phy- 
sician before they are placed on parole. Our health work is such a 
vital part of our work and has been so seriously hampered for 
lack of funds during the past biennium, that we are asking not 
only for the restoration of our medical budget from $1,750 
(which is totally inadequate) to its original $2,000, but we are 
asking also for a small additional amount on account of in- 
creased cost of drugs and medical supplies, and to bring the 
whole of our nurse's salary under this subhead — bringing the 
total to $2,410 for our medical-dental-surgical budget. 

In closing, we wish to stress the direct value, limited only 
by our facilities, of our work to the communities of the state, 
and especially to the defense areas, and to point out the greatly 
increased need, as a direct result of war activities, of the work 
done by Colony. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Elsa Ernst, Superintendent. 



6 Biennial Report for 1940-41—1941-42 

REPORT OF MEDICAL DIRECTOR 

A healthy body is the prime factor in a healthy mind. The health of 
the institution during the biennium has been unusually good. There have 
been no epidemics, contagious or infectious diseases. The water supply has 
been checked at monthly intervals and found good. The kitchens and 
buildings have been found sanitary at all times. There is an increased 
urgency of the need for more buildings, personnel and facilities, due to 
our location so close to the camps of the armed forces. More space and 
personnel are badly needed to enable the Colony to assume its share of 
responsibility towards bettering conditions around the camps. 

Thomas Leslie Lee, M.D., F.A.G.S. 






State Industrial Farm Colony for Women 



MEDICAL STATISTICS 
For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1941 and 1942 





YEARS 


ENDED 




June 30, 1941 


June 30, 1942 




51 
46 
46 
129 
175 
6 
8 

192 

187 

379 

6 


59 




60 




60 


Additional Wassermanns (rechecks) 


119 




179 




14 




8 


Syphilitic treatments: 


306 




266 


Total number of syphilitic treatments . 


572 


Number of syphilitic cases negative on discharge 


11 


Number of syphilitic cases negative after treatment to June 30, 1941, but still in 


11 


Number of syphilitic cases still under treatment in institution June 30, 1942 


9 

46 

46 

46 

102 

148 

5 

4 

648 

12 

4 

3 


9 
59- 




59 




59 




136 




205- 




17 




37 




777 




15 




205 




All 








2,380 
53 
43 

7 
7 
3 






52 




57 




17 




17 




1 








5 
123 
140 
122 
124 J 
132 
36 

3 

1 




Average weight on admission 


120 




135 




110 




120 




59 




59 




16 

















Biennial Report for 1940-41—1941-42 



DENTAL STATISTICS AND REPORT 
For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1941 and 1942 





YEARS ENDED 




June 30, 1941 


June 30, 1942 




54 

46 

34 

16 

111 

165 

13 

699 

8 

7 

110 

37 

4 

13 


58 




58 




43 




68 




192 




256 




10 




866 




14 




14 




55 




24 




14 




25 








768 
49 
16 


1,085 




50 




22 







The percentage of new cases positive for Vincent's infection for the 
biennium just closed shows a decrease from the previous biennium. From 
July 1940 through June 1942, 69 per cent of new cases were positive for 
Vincent's infection, while during 1938 to 1940, 77 per cent showed infection. 
All cases are treated until negative. 

The careful supervision given in the institution at all times results 
in very effective dental care. We are still badly in need of a dental engine 
which would enable us to take care of many cavities which we are now 
unable to care for. 

Geo. W. Price, D.D.S. 



State Industrial Farm Colony for Women 9 

GENERAL INFORMATION 
Date of opening April 3, 1929 

Plant at June 30, 1940 : 

Land, 488 acres (106 farmed) $ 4,880.00 

Buildings 129,816.57 

Equipment 23,187.69 



Total value $157,884.26 

Offiicers and employees in service at end of year: 

1940-41 1941-42 

Superintendent 1 

Budget officer and secretary 1 

Nurse 1 

Dietitian ... : 1 

Housemothers 2 

Classroom teacher 

Farm teacher 1 

Laundry teacher 1 

Farm manager 1 

Farm hands _■ 2 2 

Total 11 12 



10 



Biennial Report for 1940-41 — 1941-42 

MOVEMENT OF POPULATION 





YEARS 


ENDED 


Persons in Institution 


June 30, 1941 


June 30, 1942 




49 

31 
4 


46 


Admissions during year: 


53 


















21 


21 








56 


74 








105 


120 






Separations during year: 


37 


39 








2 


1 








20 


26 






Total separations from institution 


59 


66 




46 


54 








46.37 
55 


48.15 




55 






Movement of Population by Cases 






Total cases, first of year: 


49 
143 


46 




157 








192 

46 
157 


203 


Total cases, end of year: 


54 




144 








203 
31 

223 
20 

203 


198 




53 




253 




55 




198 







State Industrial Farm Colony for Women 



11 



Revenues and Expenditures 
PERMANENT IMPROVEMENT FUND 
At June 30, 1942 



Revenues: 

Appropriation— Chapter 296 of 1937, Code 1433 
Appropriation — Chapter 1 of 1938, Code 1475.. 

Expenditures: 

Appropriation — 1937 

Appropriation — 1938 

Balances: 

Appropriation — 1937 

Appropriation — 1938 . 



$ 


7,000.00 
9,625.00 


$ 


16,625.00 


i 


6,862.70 
9,593.85 


s 


16,466.55 


$ 


137.30 
31.15 



168.45 



Revenues and Expenditures 

MAINTENANCE FUND 

For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1941 and 1942 



Fiscal Year 
1940-1941 



Fiscal Year 
1941-1942 



Revenues 
Appropriation: 

Chapter 195 of Public Laws of 1939 

Chapter 107 of Public Laws of 1941 

Institutional receipts: sale of farm products 

Total revenues... _ 

Expenditures 

Administration... 

Custodial care 

Agricultural. 

Operation and maintenance of plant 

Additions and betterments 

Total expenditures 

Balance reverted to general fund 



$ 


24,883.00 
107.53 


$ 


27,331.00 
112.00 


i 


24,990.53 


$ 


27,443.00 


$ 


3,772.50 
10,507.78 
4,034.67 
4,153.12 
496.58 


$ 


3,861.00 
11,428.26 
3,977.89 
3,245.66 
4,548.15 


$ 


22,964.65 


1 


27,060.96 


t 


2,025.88 


$ 


382.04 



12 



Biennial Report for 1940-41 — 1941-42 



AVERAGE POPULATION AND MAINTENANCE PER CAPITA COST 
For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1941 and 1942 



Function 


Fiscal Year 
1940-1941 


Fiscal Year 
1941-1942 




$ 78.07 

217.46 

83.50 

85.95 

10.28 


$ 80.19 




237.35 




82.61 




67.41 




94.46 






Total 


$ 476.26 


$ 562.01 








46.37 


48.15 







FARM PRODUCTION 



Item 



Fiscal Year 
1940-1941 



Fiscal Year 
1941-1942 



Fruits: 

Cantaloupes.. 

Citrons 

Grapes 

Strawberries- 
Watermelons . 



Vegetables: 



Cabbage. _. 

Carrots 

Corn 

Cucumbers. 

Lettuce 

Mustard 

Okra 



Peppers, bell 

Potatoes, Irish.. 
Potatoes, sweet. 

Onions 

Radishes 

Rudabagas 

Squash 

Tomatoes 

Turnips 

Turnip greens.. 



2.80 
10.40 
11.00 



97.80 



122.00 



26.40 

133.75 

26.00 

17.55 

3.56 
54.13 
74.00 

1.00 
30.00 

1.09 

2.00 



42.00 

22.00 

5.00 

1.50 

9.85 

86.00 

68.00 

25.50 

63.75 



693.18 



76.10 
33.00 
7.00 
11.00 
51.00 



178.00 



120.00 
266.00 
20.00 
60.00 
16.00 
70.08 
36.00 
16.50 



84.00 

3.00 

10.00 

150.00 

625.25 

120.00 

4.50 



44.50 

177.00 

5.00 

67.50 



1,926.33 



State Industrial Farm Colony for Women 



13 



FARM PRODUCTION 



Item 


Fiscal Year 
1940-1941 


Fiscal Year 
1941-1942 


Eggs and Milk: 

Eggs - 


$ 459.13 
2,725.80 


$ 162.90 


Milk.., 


3,076.83 








$ 3,184.93 


$ 3,230.73 


Meat: 


$ 379.20 
IncL 

18.25 
620.00 
143.75 


$ 11.33 




26.40 








655.80 




100.45 




78.90 










$ 1,161.20 


$ 872.88 


Shortening: 


$ 168.53 
22.00 


$ 156.00 




46.20 








$ 190.53 


$ 202.20 








Farm Products Used on Farm: 

Hay. 


$ 390.00 

735.00 

16.00 

4.90 

144.00 

50.00 


$ 520.00 


Feed corn 


585.00 


Soy beans 


Incl. 




80.00 




300.00 




60.00 








$ 1,339.90 


$ 1,545.00 


Farm Products Sold: 

Calf 




$ 5.00 


Cows (2).. 




67.38 


Eggs 


$ 48.87 










$ 48.87 


$ 72.38 


Total Production _ 


% 6,740.61 
58.66 


$ 8,036.52 












$ 6,799.27 


$ 8,036.52 




Cat No 23 233 



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